Threads of Thought

inspiration, Communication, connection
Something wicked this way comes. I’ll be releasing prints of “Sinnah” next week. More info to come :)

Something wicked this way comes. I’ll be releasing prints of “Sinnah” next week. More info to come :)

These are my two contributions to the Kubrick show at Spoke Art (@spokeart), opening Sept 6th. For enquiries, please email spokeartgallery@gmail.com.

The Kubrick show is happening this weekend @spoke_art. This is my piece “Eyes Wide Shut”, 16”x20”, oil on wood. For all enquiries please contact spokeartgallery@gmail.com.

The Kubrick show is happening this weekend @spoke_art. This is my piece “Eyes Wide Shut”, 16”x20”, oil on wood. For all enquiries please contact spokeartgallery@gmail.com.

austinkleon:

Roger Ebert’s sketchbook and thoughts on drawing

While I was watching Life Itself last night, I noticed two or three drawings in the mix of images, none of which were commented on.

Had I been reading his blog more carefully, I would’ve come across this blog post, “You Can Draw, and Probably Better Than I Can,” where he explains how he met a woman named Annette Goodheart in the early 1980s, who convinced him that all children can draw, it’s just that some of us stop:

The break in our childish innocence comes the first time we use an eraser. We draw a chin and think it looks nothing like a chin, and in frustration we erase it. That’s it. Our bond of trust with our artistic instinct has been severed. We will be erasing for the rest of our lives. I speak here not of great and accomplished artists, for whom I hold great awe, but for you and me, whose work, let’s face it, will not soon be given a gallery show.

It seems to me Annette said something like this: Begin with a proper sketch book. Draw in ink. Finish each drawing you begin, and keep every drawing you finish. No erasing, no ripping out a page, no covering a page with angry scribbles. What you draw is an invaluable and unique representation of how you saw at that moment in that place according to your abilities. That’s all we want. We already know what a dog really looks like.

When he was in London, Ebert bought a Daler sketchbook and a drawing pen across the street from the English National Opera.

I settled down in a nearby pub and began to sketch a glass, which is no more than an arrangement of ovals and lines. I continued to draw throughout the 1990s… I sketched mostly on vacation. I had the time. In Chicago there was always a deadline, someplace to be, a phone ringing. On vacation I found a cafe or a park bench, or was waiting for a concert to begin, or whatever.

He soon found out that the quality of his drawings didn’t matter at all — it was the mere fact that he drew them:

That was the thing no one told me about. By sitting somewhere and sketching something, I was forced to really look at it, again and again, and ask my mind to translate its essence through my fingers onto the paper. The subject of my drawing was fixed permanently in my memory. Oh, I “remember” places I’ve been and things I’ve seen. I could tell you about sitting in a pub on Kings’ Road and seeing a table of spike-haired kids starting a little fire in an ash tray with some lighter fluid. I could tell you, and you would be told, and that would be that. But in sketching it I preserved it. I had observed it.

I found this was a benefit that rendered the quality of my drawings irrelevant. Whether they were good or bad had nothing to do with their most valuable asset: They were a means of experiencing a place or a moment more deeply. The practice had another merit. It dropped me out of time. I would begin a sketch or watercolor and fall into a waking reverie. Words left my mind. A zone of concentration formed. I didn’t think a tree or a window. I didn’t think deliberately at all. My eyes saw and my fingers moved and the drawing happened. Conscious thought was what I had to escape, so I wouldn’t think, Wait! This doesn’t look anything like that tree! or I wish I knew how to draw a tree! I began to understand why Annette said finish every drawing you start. By abandoning perfectionism you liberate yourself to draw your way. And nobody else can draw the way you do.

As he wrote in a Facebook post, “An artist using a sketchbook always looks like a happy person.” 

Knowing Ebert himself drew means a lot to me, as the only direct contact I ever had with Ebert was this Facebook post where he praised one of my drawings.

He published a little paperback with some of his drawings (Two Weeks In Midday Sun: A Cannes Notebook), but, unfortunately, it’s out of print. Luckily, you can read all of his thoughts on drawings and flip through some of his drawings on Flickr.

Filed under: Roger Ebert

redsuelo:

amberrosehairline:

myvoicemyright:

Acid attack survivors in India model new clothing range for powerful photoshoot

Survivors of acid attacks in India have become the face of a new clothing range designed by a woman who had acid thrown in her face while she was asleep four years ago.Delhi-based designer Rupa and her friends Rita, Sonam, Laxmi and Chanchal modelled the clothes from her new range, Rupa Designs, for photographer Rahul Saharan.

Rupa suffered extensive injuries when her stepmother threw acid in her face while she was sleeping in 2008.

She was allegedly left without any medical aid for six hours before her uncle found her and transported her to hospital, where she underwent eleven operations and spent three months being cared for.

this is so powerful

Bless them and their beautiful spirits

(via infectioushumanwaste)

In-progress.

In-progress.

New oil painting of @ohthumbelina (slightly cropped). Working up to larger pieces. This is for sale. Email me at mandytsung@gmail.com if you’re interested.

New oil painting of @ohthumbelina (slightly cropped). Working up to larger pieces. This is for sale. Email me at mandytsung@gmail.com if you’re interested.

Painted this study of @ohthumbelina today, about 3 hrs, oil on Arches paper. I couldn’t get a photo that captured the warm colours of the painting, try as I might 😓

Painted this study of @ohthumbelina today, about 3 hrs, oil on Arches paper. I couldn’t get a photo that captured the warm colours of the painting, try as I might 😓

A different approach to my masked girls.

A different approach to my masked girls.

Empowerment

You don’t realize how strange your life is until you start sharing it with other people, telling your stories, and seeing the shock on people’s faces. Not to say that everybody hasn’t had a strange life, but everybody’s life is incredibly different, if even just in the way a person retells it. But it also feels really good to talk about it, to counteract the weight of holding it all in; of normalizing it in your head so that it doesn’t hurt you anymore (or so you think). Sometimes I even tell myself that all the anger I hold in is useful, but deep down I know that’s not true because it feels more like pain than anger most days. I want to tell you everything, and one day I will, because even though I’ve told myself throughout my life that I am an empowered person, I realize that I’m not. Being unable to speak about my life experiences is a result of the overpowering shame that I feel for the things that have happened, and the fear of what people will think and do if they knew. How can I be empowered when I am ashamed of myself and afraid of everyone around me? It’s really the opposite of empowerment, it’s oppression.

I plan to change that one story at a time.

And another one 😁 I feel like I’m finding a personal vocabulary of symbols lately, which is what I’ve struggled with forever.

And another one 😁 I feel like I’m finding a personal vocabulary of symbols lately, which is what I’ve struggled with forever.

Late night doodle. I was walking home and saw a shape in the bedroom window of a tall old house. It looked like half a face was floating there, watching without eyes.

Late night doodle. I was walking home and saw a shape in the bedroom window of a tall old house. It looked like half a face was floating there, watching without eyes.

Detail pic of a quick study of Lady Lyndon for @spoke_art’s Kubrick show next month. I’ve always wanted to paint a fancy 18th century lady! Oil on wood.

Detail pic of a quick study of Lady Lyndon for @spoke_art’s Kubrick show next month. I’ve always wanted to paint a fancy 18th century lady! Oil on wood.

It’s OK not to be a genius, whatever that is, if there even is such a thing…the creative life may or may not be the apex of human civilization, but either way it’s not what I thought it was. It doesn’t make you special and sparkly. You don’t have to walk alone. You can work in an office — I’ve worked in offices for the past 15 years and written five novels while doing it. The creative life is forgiving: You can betray it all you want, again and again, and no matter how many times you do, it will always take you back.

Lev Grossman manages to smash “you don’t have to be a genius” and “keep your day job” into his great essay, "How Not to Write a Novel" (his book, The Magician’s Land, is out this week)

(Source: annajarzab, via austinkleon)